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healthy food for you

I am 50 years old, and was treated for hormone imbalance, hypothyroidism, and Ankylosing Spondylitis. I had been dealing with AS since 1998, and on a drug called Enbrel that I desperately wanted to discontinue. I was convinced it was the reason for my fatigue, weight gain, grey complexion, insomnia, uncontrollable appetite, loss of endurance, muscle loss, and body aches. I did my first Whole30 in February 2013. After 30 days, my cholesterol and triglycerides were better than normal, I had lost weight (20 pounds), my skin wasn’t grey, I could exercise longer and feel good afterward, and I was sleeping better. All wins, so I stuck with it! About 90 days in, I went off the Enbrel. So here it is—you changed my life!” —DIANE W., EVANSVILLE, IN e’re starting things off with what we consider the necessities. You should already have most of these things in your kitchen, unless you’ve been living off nothing but take-out and microwave meals for the last decade. Which, thanks to today’s fast-food, convenience-food, eat-it-in-your-car culture, isn’t actually uncommon. So if that’s the case, we’re not judging. But we’re awfully glad you’re here. If you’re ready to invest in your Whole30 experience now, but aren’t sure what you need, this is a detailed list of our essentials and “nice-to-haves.” However, we understand you may not be able to purchase a bunch of new kitchen tools before you start your Whole30, and that’s totally okay. You can cook your way through the book by getting creative with the tools you have on hand, and skip the recipes requiring something specific (like a food processor) that you’re missing. We purposefully made these recipes simple to prep, cook, and serve so that no one would be left out. That one cutting board you have will be working hard, but the point is, it will work. So don’t stress about this stuff, okay? You’re here, you’re committed, and we’re about to walk you through the basics in a way that (we hope) leaves you as excited about getting into your kitchen as we are to get you there. POTS AND PANS You’ll use a variety of pots and pans throughout your Whole30, but while they make a pan for every occasion, you just need a few of the most versatile. As for pots, buy a set of three or four— something that ranges from a small (1 to 2 quart) saucepan to a large (3 to 4 quart) Dutch oven. This should cover everything from sauces (like our Balsamic Glaze) to a larger dish (like the Pulled Pork Carnitas). You’ll want two frying pans (also called skillets): one should be a cast-iron or oven-safe skillet. These are great for taking dishes like our Frittata straight from the stovetop to the oven, and will last you a lifetime. It’s also nice to have one non-stick pan for eggs, and if you’re only buying two, get them both in a large size. (It’s better to have the versatility of two big pans.) If you can buy one more pan, a large high-walled sauté pan with a cover is an excellent choice for things like Cauliflower Rice or our Chicken Cacciatore. STRAINER A strainer serves double-duty, allowing you to drain water from boiled vegetables or broths (like our Bone Broths), and functioning as a steamer when placed inside a large stockpot. (You could also buy one large pot with a steamer/strainer insert, if you want to be really fancy.) It’s nice to have two strainers—one fine mesh hand-held strainer to filter out smaller particles of food, and a larger one with bigger holes for straining out larger pieces and steaming. MEASURING CUPS AND SPOONS You’ll need at least one basic set of measuring cups and spoons, but we highly recommend doubling up, especially if you aren’t comfortable eyeballing measurements. You’d be surprised how many times you’ll need a teaspoon as you cook your way through this book. It’s also a good idea to have at least one larger glass measuring cup with a pouring spout—something that can handle three or four cups at a time. You’ll use this for things like our Basic Mayonnaise, or any recipe that calls for more than a cup of broth. BAKING SHEETS You won’t be making chocolate chip cookies on the Whole30, but you will be roasting and baking lots of meat and vegetables in the oven. Make sure you have at least two baking sheets, so you don’t crowd your sweet potatoes when they’re roasting. (See our vegetable roasting tips.) CUTTING BOARDS We’ll be up front about this: there is a lot of chopping in your future. (Just take Melissa’s lead and think of it as stress relief.) To ensure you aren’t constantly running between the counter and the sink, you should have at least three cutting boards— different sizes are also really nice. (Why break out your largest board just to mince a clove of garlic?) We’re generally not fans of plastic cutting boards, even though they’re cheap and easy to wash. One recent study found more bacteria are recovered from plastic surfaces than wood, and the plastic is easy to mar with your knife, which means plastic gets into your food. No bueno. However, if you want a cheap cutting board for car camping or as backup, plastic will do the trick. Bamboo is a good option, and relatively inexpensive, but they’re so hard they tend to dull knives fast. (We’ll get to that.) Maple is a splurge, but boy will it look pretty sitting on your kitchen counter, and it’s kind to knives. Our favorite cutting boards are made from recycled wood fiber—they’re eco-friendly, a snap to clean, and dry super fast. KNIVES We know you have knives, but do you have Whole30-worthy knives? Investing in a few good, sharp knives will make your Whole30 experience more enjoyable than eating almond butter straight off the spoon. And that is pretty enjoyable. Your knife options are even more complicated than your pot and pan options, so let’s just talk about the basics. You’ll want to get three knives—a paring knife for small cuts (like dicing an apple), an 8-inch chef’s knife designed for chopping, and a long, thin slicing knife for carving things like Braised Beef Brisket and the turkey from our Holiday Dinner. Look for knives that are all one piece (not a blade and handle joined together), and spend some money here. Trust us, this is one investment that will pay you back every single time you cook. Oh, and don’t forget the knife sharpener. If you’re like us, you’ll become slightly obsessed with making sure your knives slice through tomatoes like butter. FOOD PROCESSOR We know this sounds like an expensive tool, but there are a number of excellent products to fit any budget. But first, what’s the difference between a food processor and a blender? Blenders only blend if the food is soft and there’s enough liquid in the mixture; for many of our sauces (like the Romesco Sauce) or mashes (like the Cauliflower Mash), there just isn’t enough liquid to work. You could use a hand-held immersion blender—those are incredibly versatile, make small jobs like Basic Mayonnaise) a snap, and clean up in five seconds flat—but those don’t chop anywhere near as finely as a food processor, sometimes leaving you with chunks of ingredients in what should be a smooth final product. A food processor is designed to take solid ingredients and chop, shred, or mix them to a perfect consistency. You can use them to finely chop cilantro or parsley for our Chimichurri, dice tomatoes for our Salsa, or smooth out our Tangy BBQ Sauce. If you’re cooking for one, you may be able to get away with a mini-food processor for around $25. However, these only process foods in small batches (usually just two or three cups at a time), and if you’re doubling our Cauliflower Mash recipe for a family of four, that small motor will be working awfully hard. However, that doesn’t mean you need a $400 professional-grade appliance; there are plenty of seven-to-ten cup food processors available for between $40 and $100—some are even combination blenders/food processors, saving you money and counter space. MEAT THERMOMETER This is one of the most important tools for the budding chef. Cooking meat and poultry to just the right degree—not too raw, not overdone, just right—takes time, attention, and lots of practice, but using a meat thermometer is like cheating in a good way. We’ve given you the perfect cooking temperature for dishes like Perfect Whole Roasted Chicken, Perfect Grilled Steak, and Walnut-Crusted Pork Tenderloin. By taking the guesswork out of when your meat is ready to remove from the oven, you’re far more likely to nail the perfect level of doneness on the first try, and avoid having to choke down expensive meat that you accidentally overcooked. Make sure you get a meat thermometer (designed to tell you the internal temperature of meat) and not an oven thermometer (designed to tell you how hot your oven really is on the inside). Look for something that says “instant read” (though these actually take about 20 seconds to get up to the right temperature)—you should be able to find one for around $10. PARCHMENT PAPER You’re probably used to lining your baking sheets and dishes with aluminum foil—which means you’re also used to your more delicate meats and veggies sticking to the foil like crazy. This is where parchment paper comes in. It’s a moistureresistant paper specially treated for oven use, keeping your dishes clean and your No-Fuss Salmon Cakes, Chicken Meatballs, or Balsamic Roasted Sweet Potatoes sliding onto the spatula with ease. At about $3 a roll, this is a great investment for easy Whole30 kitchen clean up. T whole30 really-nice-to-haves echnically, these kitchen tools aren’t absolutely necessary for your Whole30 kitchen, but they sure will cut your prep time and expand your range of cooking techniques. Plus, most of these cost under ten dollars—a steal, given how easy they make so many of your Whole30-related kitchen tasks. GARLIC PRESS Mincing garlic is one of our least-favorite tasks; it’s a challenge to get the pieces small enough before you’re bored out of your mind with chopping. However, mincing by hand is only one option—there’s also the garlic press. Peel the clove, put it in the press, squeeze the handle, and you’ve got perfectly minced garlic in ten seconds. They key to this tool is making sure you rinse the leftover garlic pulp out of the press as soon as you’re done (before it dries and hardens), and use a kitchen brush or toothbrush to keep the holes clean. Or, just buy minced garlic in a jar and call it good. It’s more expensive, but it’s definitely got the convenience factor going for it. JULIENNE PEELER Vegetable noodles are an easy way to add variety to your Whole30 meals in a way that’s fun for the whole family. Our Roasted Spaghetti Squash is naturally spaghetti-like, but for vegetables like zucchini or cucumber, you need a way to turn them into noodles. Enter the julienne peeler. It looks just like a normal peeler (and works the same way), but its special grooves turns vegetables into long, thin strings, just like noodles. You can find them for under $10 at any kitchen store, and it only takes about a minute to julienne an entire zucchini. If you want to splurge a bit here, you could also buy a fancy tool called a spiral slicer for about $40. This nifty gadget slices, grates, or juliennes any vegetable in a way that basically guarantees your kids will help with your dinner prep, and makes things like Melissa’s Chicken Hash a breeze to prepare. CITRUS JUICER Trust us on this one—squeezing lemons and limes by hand is messy, and doesn’t ever get all the juice out. Buy a hand-held combination lemon/lime squeezer for around $10. The end. ZESTER Many of our recipes call for citrus zest—that is, tiny pieces of the lemon, lime, or orange peel mixed right into the dish. You’d be surprised at how much flavor a small amount of zest can add, but getting to it can be a pain without the right tool. You could use a vegetable peeler to remove strips of the skin, then tediously chop them into skinny strips or tiny pieces. Or, you could use a $5 zester and do the same job in three seconds. A zester has tiny holes designed to remove long, skinny pieces of skin as you scrape it down the outside of your citrus fruit, no extra chopping required. Or, for about $15, buy a Microplane—a multifunctional miniature grater perfect for zesting fruit or grating spices (like nutmeg) or roots (like ginger). MEAT TENDERIZER This handy and inexpensive kitchen tool looks like a hammer of sorts, with a long handle, one flat end, and one texturized end. It’s pretty literal in name—you essentially whack your steak, chicken breast, or pork shoulder to break up the muscle fibers. It’s been described as “pre-chewing the meat,” only less messy. This is one easy way to make tougher cuts more tender, or to ensure those who prefer well-done meat aren’t chewing for hours. It’s also a great way to speed up cooking times, and get more consistent results. You know how there’s always one end of the chicken breast that’s thicker than the other? Without pounding it flat, you’ll end up with the thin end overcooked by the time the thicker end is cooked through. Use a meat tenderizer to make the chicken from our Perfect Seared Chicken Breasts or Harvest Grilled Chicken Salad uniform in thickness so it cooks faster and more evenly all around. To minimize mess, place a sheet of plastic wrap or wax paper over your meat before you start hammering away, and make sure you properly clean and sanitize your meat tenderizer immediately after use. GRILL BASKET Our final recommendation isn’t a necessity—we give you two other ways to grill vegetables and fruit in our recipe for Perfect Grilled Vegetables—but none as easy as using a basket. Chop your veggies up, toss them in some oil, throw them in the basket, and leave them on the grill while you tend to the rest of your food. Every once in a while, give them a shake. Yep, that’s it. You can buy a grill basket for around $20; some even have heat-proof handles to make taking it on and off the grill easier. One tip to make the most of this kitchen tool—put it on the grill while you’re preheating. A warmed grill basket will cook your vegetables faster and with less “stick” than a cold one. We may mention other kitchen items, like cheesecloth for straining Clarified Butter or a basting brush to use with our Baby Back Ribs, but there are easy workarounds if you don’t have these. We also mention some pretty specific tools with our Fancypants Meals—these are important for this particular dish, even though you may only use them once a year. In summary, there are more kitchen gadgets, appliances, and tools than you could ever hope to use in a single year, and it’s up to you to decide what’s important to you, and what fits your budget. (We love our avocado saver, although even we think it’s a little silly.) Make notes as you work your way through these recipes of tools you’re missing, or tools that might make your prep a little easier. Then, figure out what’s most important to you, and add to your collection over time, as you can. Don’t stress about outfitting it all at once. You have the rest of your life to build your kitchen, because the Whole30 is just your first step in a long, rewarding, delicious journey of cooking (and eating) real food. So now that your kitchen is well stocked with the basics, it’s high-time you start cooking! For our kitchen tool recommendations, including brands and models we like, visit www.whole30.com/whole30kitchen. I whole30 cooking fundamentals “I had always been a terrible cook. Cooking totally stressed me out, and I was envious of people who loved it. The Whole30 forced me to seek out recipes I could make. I started following Whole30 food bloggers and bought new cookbooks. I started cooking most days of the week. Now, meals for me and my family are healthy and delicious! I am definitely better at cooking and much more kitchenconfident as a result of my Whole30.” — ANDREA R., NASHVILLE, TN n this section, we’re going to teach you how to cook meat, seafood, eggs, and vegetables, and make some Whole30 fundamental ingredients like bone broth, mayonnaise, and clarified butter. We’ll also walk you through some basic knife cuts, because boy, will you be chopping. This section is where you build your kitchen confidence, perfecting your techniques for roasting, baking, steaming, searing, and grilling. You’ll learn how to cook your steak to the perfect temperature, how to keep your chicken breasts juicy and tender, and discover you actually do like mayonnaise. (You do. Trust us.) You’ll experiment with four different ways to cook your vegetables, (quadrupling your chances of falling in love with Brussels sprouts), discover making bone broth is actually really easy, and learn which grilling technique is right for those pineapple slices you’ve been craving. Consider this section the perfect prep for the more than one hundred recipes to follow in the fourth part of this book. We could go on, but we won’t, because you look hungry.

Knife Cuts CHIFFONADE (RIBBON CUT) The French word chiffonade means “little ribbons,” referring to leafy greens like spinach, lettuce, kale, and herbs like basil that have been cut into long, thin strips. To chiffonade, stack your greens or herbs from large (on the bottom) to small (on top) and roll into a cigar shape. Then, cut thin slices perpendicular to the roll to make ribbons. DICE To dice means to cut food into small blocks of a specific size. Dicing creates evenly sized pieces so they’ll all cook at the same rate. You’ll see three sizes mentioned here: large dice (1-inch cubes), medium (or unspecified) dice (½-inch cubes), and small (or fine) dice (¼-inch cubes). To dice, slice the vegetable into rectangular strips that are ¼ inch thick (small dice), ½ inch thick (medium), or 1 inch thick (large). Line the strips up together and cut across at the same size to create cubes. Don’t bust out the ruler here—it’s less important that your dice are exactly the right size, and more important that all your cubes are similarly shaped. JULIENNE This knife cut makes long, thin strips (like matchsticks) on longer vegetables like carrots, potatoes, jicama, and bell pepper quarters. Technically, a proper julienne will measure ⅛ inch square and 2 inches long. To julienne, trim off the sides of the vegetable (if necessary), creating a flat surface on each side and turning it into more of a rectangle shape. (You can still use the ends for salads, soups, or other meals.) Slice the vegetable lengthwise into ⅛-inch slices. Stack the slices and cut again lengthwise at ⅛-inch increments to create matchstick-size strips. Again, don’t worry about the exact size—just cut them thin and uniform in thickness. MINCE The word mince just means to very finely chop. It’s usually used with garlic, onions, and chile peppers like jalapeño. To mince, slice the vegetable into very thin strips. Line the strips up together and cut across in very thin slices to create tiny pieces. To mince garlic, you can also use a garlic press—it’s much faster than cutting by hand. We may also ask you to “finely chop” ingredients like celery, mushrooms, or other vegetables. That’s somewhere between a small dice and a mince—just chop until the pieces are small, and don’t worry about their shape or size. ROUGH CHOP This is the easiest knife cut, because it’s nowhere near as precise as a dice or julienne. A rough chop is perfect for soups, stews, or vegetables headed for the food processor—where it doesn’t matter how pretty the vegetables look. To roughly chop, cut the vegetable in half horizontally and vertically. Slice in half a few more times until the pieces are in large chunks. Don’t overthink this! Just take those veggies and chop ’em up. perfect boiled eggs SERVES 2 PREP TIME: 5 minutes COOK TIME: 7 to 10 minutes TOTAL TIME: 12 to 15 minutes

This technique and cook times are the same whether you boil 2 eggs or a dozen. We like boiling a large amount at once for onthe-go protein or to include in a Protein Salad. PREPARE a small bowl half-full with ice water. FILL a small saucepan halfway with water. Bring the water to a rolling boil, then add the eggs by sliding them gently into the pan with a wooden spoon. FOR soft-boiled eggs, cook on high heat for 7 minutes. (This will leave your eggs truly soft-boiled, with very runny yolks.) For soft but not runny yolks, cook for 9 minutes. For true hard-boiled eggs, cook for 11 minutes. REMOVE the pan from the heat, and immediately transfer them to a bowl of ice water for 5 minutes to prevent them from cooking further and make them easier to peel. TO peel your eggs, crack the shell at the very bottom of the egg. Then, peel under cool running water, using the shell membrane to guide the removal of the shell pieces. ✪ PRO TIP Use the oldest eggs you have for hard-boiling, as they’ll peel more easily. perfect fried eggs SERVES 2 PREP TIME: 3 minutes COOK TIME: 2 to 5 minutes TOTAL TIME: 5 to 8 minutes 2 tablespoons cooking fat 4 eggs, large Salt and black pepper HEAT the cooking fat in a medium skillet over medium heat and swirl to coat the bottom of the pan. When the fat is very hot, crack the eggs one by one into the pan. Step back, as these eggs will sizzle! Do your best not to break the yolks—but if they do, just keep going with the instructions. IF you really like runny yolk, carefully scoop some of the cooking fat from the pan over the egg yolks with a spoon. Repeat 5 or 6 times, helping the yolks cook faster. When the egg white is just barely opaque, slide a spatula under the egg and transfer yolkside up to a plate. IF you prefer your yolks cooked a bit more, skip the spoon part; when the egg white is just barely opaque, carefully slide a spatula under the eggs and flip them over. Cook for 1 to 2 minutes for “over easy,” 3 to 4 minutes for “over medium.” If you prefer your yolks “over hard” (not soft at all), carefully flip the eggs over again and cook for an additional 30 seconds to 1 minute. REMOVE the eggs from the pan, transfer them to a plate yolkside up and serve hot with a sprinkle of salt and pepper. ✪ PRO TIP You could use a cast-iron pan for fried eggs, but it’s hard to keep them from sticking. This is where it’s nice to have at least one non-stick pan. perfect poached eggs SERVES 2 PREP TIME: 3 minutes COOK TIME: 3 to 5 minutes TOTAL TIME: 6 to 8 minutes 2 teaspoons white vinegar 1 teaspoon salt 4 eggs, large FILL a large skillet with 2 to 3 inches of water and add the vinegar and salt. Bring the water to a boil over high heat. WHILE waiting for the water to boil, carefully crack each egg into separate small bowls. WHEN the water comes to a boil, gently pour each egg into the water. As soon as all of the eggs are in the pan, remove the pan from the heat, cover, and let sit for 3 minutes (for very soft yolks), or 5 minutes (for firm yolks). REMOVE the cooked eggs from the pan with a slotted spoon, allowing any excess water to drain. Serve warm. ✪PRO TIP Use the freshest eggs you have when poaching, as the egg white is thicker when fresh. You can also use poaching cups or a poaching tray; both are inexpensive kitchen tools that make the process a bit more foolproof. (Cooking times may vary from above when using these gadgets.) perfect scrambled eggs SERVES 2 PREP TIME: 3 minutes COOK TIME: 8 to 10 minutes TOTAL TIME: 10 minutes 4 eggs, large 1 tablespoon coconut milk (optional) ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon black pepper 2 tablespoons cooking fat CRACK the eggs in a small bowl, add the coconut milk if using, and the salt and pepper. Mix together with a whisk or fork until the eggs are uniform in texture and appear fluffy (from all the air you’ve whipped into them). MELT the cooking fat in a medium skillet over medium heat and swirl to coat the bottom of the pan. When the cooking fat is hot, pour the eggs into the pan. Use a spatula to fold the cooked eggs from the outer edges into the middle. Then scrape the cooked eggs from the bottom of the pan, so the uncooked portion can flow into contact with the hot pan. Repeat every minute or so while cooking. COOK until the eggs look slightly shiny (but not runny), 5 to 7 minutes, and serve warm. ✪ PRO TIP Your eggs will continue to cook after you remove them from the heat, so transfer them out of the pan just before you think they look done. perfect ground meat SERVES 2 PREP TIME: 5 minutes COOK TIME: 5 to 10 minutes TOTAL TIME: 10 to 15 minutes Cooking fat, as needed 1 pound ground meat Ground meat (beef, bison, buffalo, lamb, chicken, or turkey) is one of the easiest proteins to whip up in a hurry, and it’s incredibly versatile. The trick is using the right amount of cooking fat in your pan, and experimenting with different seasoning combinations to change the flavor of your meal so you don’t get bored. PLACE a large pan on medium heat. Add the cooking fat to the pan, if necessary, and swirl to coat the bottom of the pan. Add the ground meat to the pan, breaking it up into large chunks with a spatula or wooden spoon. As the meat starts to brown, continue to break the meat up into smaller and smaller pieces, stirring so the meat cooks evenly. Cook until the meat is browned through and no pink remains, 7 to 10 minutes. REMOVE the meat from the pan with either a slotted spoon (to leave some fat in the pan), or a large spoon (to enjoy the added fat with your meat). ✪ GENERAL RULE OF THUMB: The leaner the meat, the more cooking fat you want to use in the pan. GROUND BEEF, 80 PERCENT LEAN: no cooking fat required GROUND LAMB: no cooking fat required GROUND BEEF, 85 TO 90 PERCENT LEAN: 1 tablespoon of cooking fat per pound GROUND CHICKEN THIGH: 1 tablespoon of cooking fat per pound GROUND BEEF, 95 PERCENT LEAN: 2 tablespoons of cooking fat per pound GROUND BISON/BUFFALO: 2 tablespoons of cooking fat per pound GROUND CHICKEN BREAST: 2 tablespoons of cooking fat per pound GROUND TURKEY: 2 tablespoons of cooking fat per pound It’s also a good idea to double the amount of ground meat you cook with dinner and transfer half (unseasoned) to a storage container to refrigerate, so you can make a totally different lunch or dinner tomorrow with the leftovers! For example, you could use half the ground beef to make our Stuffed Peppers for dinner tonight, then reheat the rest of the ground beef and top with Salsa, Guacamole, and a drizzle of Ranch Dressing for an easy lunch tomorrow. You can also make your ground meat an easy one-pot meal by cooking the meat, transferring it to a holding dish when it’s browned, then cooking a mix of vegetables in the fat that’s left in the pan. When the vegetables are done, return the meat to the pan, stir to reheat and combine, and serve, topped with your favorite dressing or sauce. ✪ PRO TIP Try a variety of seasonings to change the flavor of your dish. MEXICAN: ½ teaspoon chili powder, ¼ teaspoon cumin, ¼ teaspoon salt, ¼ teaspoon pepper, ⅛ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes, ⅛ teaspoon paprika, and sprinkle with minced cilantro. ASIAN: 2 minced garlic cloves, 1 tablespoon sesame oil, 1 teaspoon rice vinegar, ½ teaspoon ground ginger, and sprinkle with sesame seeds. ITALIAN: Our Tomato Sauce, or add 1 tablespoon pre-mixed Italian seasoning, 1 teaspoon of freshly minced herbs (oregano, thyme, or basil), ¼ teaspoon salt, and ¼ teaspoon pepper. THAI: Our Curry Sauce BBQ: Our BBQ Sauce perfect burger SERVES 3 PREP TIME: 5 minutes COOK TIME: 15 minutes TOTAL TIME: 20 minutes 1 pound ground meat 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon black pepper ½ teaspoon mustard powder ¼ teaspoon garlic powder PREHEAT the oven to 350°F. IN a large mixing bowl, combine all of the ingredients. Form into 3 equal-sized patties. Chill in the freezer for 15 minutes. TRANSFER the patties to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper if desired and roast in the oven until the internal temperature reaches 145°F, about 15 minutes. ✪ CHEF TIP For extra flavor, grill the patties over high heat for 4 minutes on each side, then remove from grill and finish in a 350°F oven for 4 to 5 minutes. TEMPERATURE GUIDELINES FOR BEEF STEAKS AND GROUND BEEF, BISON, BUFFALO, AND LAMB RARE: 120° to 125°F MEDIUM RARE: 130° to 135°F MEDIUM: 135° to 140°F MEDIUM WELL: 140° to 150°F WELL DONE: 155°F+ To achieve the perfect temperature, remove the meat from the heat when it is 5°F less than the desired temperature, as it will continue to cook while it rests. For example, if you want your steak medium, remove it from the heat at 130° to 135°F. NOTE: For safety reasons, the United States Department of Agriculture recommends cooking ground beef to a minimum temperature of 160°F and steaks and roasts to a minimum temperature of 145°F. perfect grilled steak SERVES 2 PREP TIME: 3 minutes COOK TIME: 16 to 22 minutes TOTAL TIME: 19 to 25 minutes 2 portions (5 ounces each) steak (sirloin, strip, rib eye, tenderloin) ½ teaspoon salt

REMOVE the steaks from the refrigerator at least 30 minutes before cooking. Preheat the grill to high, preheat the oven to 350°F, and line a baking sheet with foil. SEASON the steak evenly on both sides with the salt and pepper. Lay the steaks on the hot grill at a 45-degree angle to the grate. Let the steaks sear for 2 to 3 minutes. Use tongs to peek at the grill marks—your steak should pull off easily once you have a proper sear. When ready, don’t flip the steaks yet, but turn them 90 degrees to create crosshatch grill markings. Sear in this position for just 2 minutes. Flip the steaks and repeat the double searing process on the other side. REMOVE the steaks from the grill, place them on the prepared baking sheet, and put them in the oven. Bake for 8 to 12 minutes, depending on the thickness of the steak and your desired temperature (see chart). Be sure to use a meat thermometer as you learn this technique. ALLOW the steaks to rest for 5 minutes before serving. ✪ PRO TIP To achieve a proper sear, don’t peek at the halfway mark! Just let the steaks sit on the grill grates for the allotted time, then gently pull with tongs to test if they’re ready to move. TEMPERATURE GUIDELINES FOR STEAK: RARE: 120°F MEDIUM RARE: 130° to 135°F MEDIUM: 135° to 140°F MEDIUM WELL: 140° to 150°F WELL DONE: 155°F+ To achieve the perfect temperature, remove your steak from the oven 5°F early, as it will continue to cook while it rests. For example, if you want your steak medium rare, remove it from the heat at 125° to 130°F. NOTE: For safety reasons, the United States Department of Agriculture recommends cooking all steak to a minimum temperature of 160°F. perfect pan-fried steak SERVES 2 PREP TIME: 3 minutes COOK TIME: 11 to 16 minutes TOTAL TIME: 14 to 19 minutes 2 portions (5 ounces each) steak (sirloin, strip, rib eye, tenderloin) ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon black pepper 2 tablespoons cooking fat PREHEAT the oven to 350°F. SEASON the steaks evenly on both sides with the salt and pepper. In a large oven-safe skillet, melt the cooking fat over medium-high heat, swirling to coat the bottom of the pan. When the fat is hot, place the steaks in the pan and sear for 3 to 4 minutes. The steak should pull off the pan easily once you have a proper sear. Using tongs, turn the steak over and put the entire pan in the oven to finish cooking. BAKE for 8 to 12 minutes, depending on the thickness of the steak and your desired temperature (see chart). Be sure to use a meat thermometer as you learn this technique. AFTER removing the steaks from the oven, allow them to rest for 5 minutes before serving. ✪ PRO TIP If you don’t have an oven-safe pan, transfer the seared steak to a foil-lined baking pan before placing in the oven. TEMPERATURE GUIDELINES FOR STEAK: RARE: 120° to 125°F MEDIUM RARE: 130° to 135°F MEDIUM: 135° to 140°F MEDIUM WELL: 140° to 150°F WELL DONE: 155°F To achieve the perfect temperature, remove your steak from the oven 5°F early, as it will continue to cook while it rests. For example, if you want your steak medium rare, remove it from the heat at 125° to 130°F. NOTE: For safety reasons, the United States Department of Agriculture recommends cooking all steak to a minimum temperature of 160°F. perfect seared chicken breasts SERVES 2 PREP TIME: 3 minutes COOK TIME: 13 to 19 minutes TOTAL TIME: 16 to 22 minutes 2 portions (5 ounces each) skinless boneless chicken breasts ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon black pepper 2 tablespoons cooking fat PREHEAT the oven to 350°F. SEASON the chicken breasts evenly on both sides with the salt and pepper. In a large oven-safe skillet, melt the cooking fat over medium-high heat, swirling to coat the bottom of the pan. When the fat is hot, place the chicken top (rounded) side down in the pan and sear for 3 to 4 minutes. Your chicken should pull off the pan easily once you have a proper sear. Using tongs, turn the chicken over, then put the entire pan in the oven to finish cooking. BAKE for 10 to 15 minutes, depending on the thickness of the chicken, until the internal temperature reaches 160°F. Be sure to use a meat thermometer as you learn this technique. Let the chicken rest for 5 minutes before serving. ✪ PRO TIP If you don’t have an oven-safe pan, transfer the seared chicken to a foil-lined baking pan before placing in the oven. perfect whole roasted chicken SERVES 2 (WITH LEFTOVERS) PREP TIME: 10 minutes COOK TIME: 1 hour 30 minutes TOTAL TIME: 1 hour 40 minutes 1 whole chicken (4 to 6 pounds) 3 tablespoons cooking fat, melted 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon black pepper PREHEAT the oven to 425°F. IF necessary, remove the giblets from inside the chicken and discard. Rinse the chicken inside and out under cool running water and place breast-side up in a roasting pan. Rub the cooking fat evenly over the skin of the chicken and season with the salt and pepper. (If you’d like to add fresh herbs, garlic, etc., run your fingers under the skin to loosen, then place the seasonings between the skin and the meat.) ROAST the chicken uncovered for 1 hour and 30 minutes. Check the temperature by placing a meat thermometer in the thickest part of the chicken (without touching bone); it should read 160°F. LET the chicken rest for 5 minutes before serving. ✪ PRO TIP Be sure to save the carcass to make a batch of our Chicken Bone Broth. perfect grilled shrimp SERVES 2 PREP TIME: 10 minutes COOK TIME: 5 minutes TOTAL TIME: 15 minutes 1½ teaspoons garlic powder 1½ teaspoons garlic salt 1½ t

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